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Individual Events

Individual Events offer Thespians the opportunity to receive constructive feedback on prepared theatrical material and technical designs. The performance Individual Events include: Monologue, Duet Acting, Group Acting, Solo Musical Theatre, Duet Musical Theatre, and Group Musical Theatre. The
technical Individual Events include: Costume Construction, Costume Design, Lighting Design, Scenic Design, Short Film, Sound Design, Stage Management, and Theatre Marketing. Iowa also offers Team Improvisation – however, this is not an event included in the NIES program. Therefore, students participating in Team Improvisation at the Iowa Festival will not qualify for the NIES program at the International Thespian Festival.

STUDENTS MAY ONLY PARTICIPATE IN TWO INDIVIDUAL EVENTS AT FESTIVAL. Team Improvisation does count as one of these events at Iowa Festival, even though it is not a part of the NIES program.

Scoring: A performance-based assessment rubric is in place for Individual Events. The current ratings are Superior (4), Excellent (3), Good (2), and Fair (1). To qualify for NIES at the International Thespian Festival, entrants must receive an overall assessment rating of Superior at their State Chapter Conference/Festival or at a similar qualifying event for their state. The last adjudicated event in the State Chapter is the Chapter’s qualifying event. Students who register for NIES at the International Thespian Festival must appear on their State Chapter’s Individual Events Qualifier Form.

Iowa Individual Events Guide
Individual Events Rights Permission Form

IE Checklists: Costume Design - Sound Design - Scenic Design - Lighting Design - Costume Construction

Individual Event Guidelines

Acting - Monologues

In Acting – Monologues, the skills that will be measured are:

  • Use of transitions into and out of character
  • Ability to create a believable character
  • Communication of objective, tactics, and relationships
  • Use of focus and concentration
  • Integration of voice, body, movement, and staging

In a monologue performance, the entrant must present two selections following these guidelines:

  • Begin with an introduction (slating). The introduction must only include only:
    • the entrant’s names
    • troupe number
    • title of both selections
    • name(s) of the playwright
  • Remain within strict time limits
    • Time will begin once a performer begins acting after the conclusion of the introduction (slating).
    • Monologues are not to exceed three minutes.
  • Prepare two selections
    • Monologues should represent two contrasting selections (may be different in period, style or mood).
    • Each selection should be approximately one and one half minutes.
    • Each selection should reflect an important moment in the play.
    • Only one character from each play may be portrayed in each selection.
  • Choose appropriate material.
    • Material must be drawn from published scripts written for theatre.
    • Material from other forms such as poetry, fiction, or film is prohibited.
    • Stand-alone monologues found online or in monologue books are prohibited.
  • Follow strict limits on clothing and props.
    • Props (including hand held props), costumes, or theatrical makeup are not allowed.
    • One chair may be used.
    • Entrants must wear all black.
    • Entrants must wear dark, preferably black, shoes.
    • Clothing should be professional yet allow easy movement for the actor to accommodate the action of the performance.
    • Entrants should refrain from wearing anything that might distract the adjudicators.
Acting - Duet/Group Scene

In Acting – Duet/Group Scene, the skills that will be measured are:

  • Use of transitions into and out of character
  • Ability to create a believable character
  • Communication of objective, tactics, and relationships
  • Use of focus and concentration
  • Integration of voice, body, movement, and staging.

A duet is defined as a performance for two players. A group scene is defined as a performance for between three to sixteen players. In each case, every participant must be actively involved in the scene chosen for performance. In a Duet/Group Scene performance the entrants must:

  • Begin with an introduction (slating). The introduction must include only:
    • the entrants’ names
    • troupe number
    • title of the selection
    • name of the playwright
  • Remain within strict time limits.
    • Time will begin once a performer begins acting after the conclusion of the introduction (slating).
    • Duo/group scenes are not to exceed five minutes.
  • Choose appropriate material.
    • Material must be drawn from published scripts written for theatre.
    • Material from other forms such as poetry, fiction, or film is prohibited.
    • Materials found online (original scenes) or in scene books are prohibited.
    • Each participant must be actively involved in the scene.
  • Follow strict limits on clothing and props.
    • Props (including hand held props), costumes, or theatrical makeup are not allowed.
    • For duo acting, two chairs may be used.
    • For group acting, one table and up to six chairs may be used.
    • Entrants must wear all black.
    • Entrants must wear dark, preferably black, shoes.
    • Clothing should be appropriate to the situation yet allow easy movement for the actors to accommodate the action of the performance.
    • Entrants should refrain from wearing anything that might distract the adjudicators.
Musical Theatre - Solo Performance

In Musical Theatre – Solo Performance, the skills that will be measured are:

  • Use of transitions into and out of character
  • Ability to create a believable character
  • Communication of objective, tactics, and relationships through dialogue and music
  • Use of focus and concentration
  • Vocal skill and technique
  • Use of dance and movement
  • Integration of voice, body, movement, and staging.

In a musical theatre solo performance, the entrant must present one musical selection from a published script written for musical theatre. The judges will consider how well the piece is acted, not just how well it is sung. The selection may contain dialogue; however, this is primarily a “sung and not spoken” selection. Entrants must:

  • Begin with an introduction (slating). The introduction (slating) must include only:
    • the entrant’s name
    • troupe number
    • title of selection
    • name of the composer and lyricist.
  • Remain within strict time limits.
    • Time will start once the performance begins after the conclusion of the introduction (slating).
    • Musical theatre solo performances are not to exceed five minutes.
  • Choose appropriate material.
    • Material must be drawn from songs from published scripts written for theatre.
    • Material from other forms such as film, television, poetry, fiction, or popular song lyrics not interpreted as musical performance are prohibited.
  • Follow strict limits on musical accompaniment.
    • Performers MUST use pre-recorded, non-vocal musical accompaniment; no live music is permitted.
    • Accompanists are not permitted.
    • A cappella performances are not permitted.
    • Performers MUST provide their own equipment to play the recorded music.
  • Follow strict limits on clothing and props.
    • Props (including hand held props), costumes, or theatrical makeup are not allowed.
    • One chair may be used.
    • Entrants must wear all black.
    • Entrants must wear dark, preferably black, shoes.
    • Clothing should be professional yet allow easy movement for the actors to accommodate the action of the performance.
    • Entrants should refrain from wearing anything that might distract the adjudicators.

Musical Theatre - Duet/Group Performance

In Musical Theatre – Duet/Group Performance, the skills that will be measured are:

  • Use of transitions into and out of character
  • Ability to create a believable character
  • Communication of objective, tactics, and relationships through dialogue and music
  • Use of focus and concentration
  • Vocal skill and technique
  • Use of dance and movement
  • Integration of voice, body, movement, and staging

In a musical theatre duet/group performance, the entrants must present one musical selection from a published script written for musical theatre. The judges will consider how well the piece is acted, not just how well it is sung. The selection may contain dialogue; however, this is primarily a “sung and not spoken” selection. A musical theatre duet is defined as a musical theatre performance for two players. A musical theatre group scene is defined as a musical theatre performance for between three to sixteen players. In each case, every participant must be actively involved in the scene chosen for performance. Entrants must:

  • Begin with an introduction (slating). The introduction must include only:
    • the entrants’ names
    • troupe number
    • title of selection
    • name of the composer and lyricist
  • Remain within strict time limits.
    • Time will start once the performance begins after the conclusion of the introduction (slating).
    • Musical theatre duet/group performances are not to exceed five minutes.
  • Choose appropriate material.
    • Material must be drawn from songs from published scripts written for theatre.
    • Material from other forms such as film, television, poetry, fiction, or popular song lyrics not interpreted as musical performance are prohibited.
    • Each participant must be actively involved in the performance.
  • Follow strict limits on musical accompaniment.
    • Performers MUST use pre-recorded, non-vocal musical accompaniment; no live music is permitted.
    • Accompanists are not permitted.
    • A cappella performances are not permitted.
    • Performers MUST provide their own equipment to play the pre-recorded music
  • Follow strict limits on clothing and props.
    • Props (including hand held props), costumes, or theatrical makeup are not allowed.
    • For a duet musical theatre performance, two chairs may be used. For a group musical theatre performance, one table and up to six chairs may be used.
    • Entrants must wear all black.
    • Entrants must wear dark, preferably black, shoes.
    • Clothing should be professional yet allow easy movement for the actors to accommodate the action of the performance.
    • Entrants should refrain from wearing anything that might distract the adjudicators
Short Film

In Short Film, the skills that will be measured are:

  • The ability to create opening and closing titles, credits, and graphics that orient the viewer to the story
  • The ability to visually develop a story with dialogue
  • Camera, lighting, and sound use
  • Editing, including scene length and flow
  • The emotional and physical believability of the acting
  • The filmmaker’s use of film elements to create a successful product
  1. Films can be no longer than five minutes in length.
  2. Films must be of original content and may be a collaboration among entrants.

Short Film Execution:
Entrant must demonstrate:

  • Proper use of title cards and credits within the five-minute time limit
  • Properly executed camera angles and shot variation to enhance the storyline and finished product
  • Control over lighting exposures for clarity, storytelling, and a professional finished product
  • The ability to capture, record, and manipulate all audio aspects of your production
  • Controlled and manufactured editing choices that enhance the overall storytelling
  • The ability to complete a storyline which includes a clear arc (beginning, middle, and end).

Short Film Requirements:

  • Music must either be original or documented public domain material.
  • Material created by entrants that is deemed by the adjudicator(s) to be obscene or disruptive may receive lower ratings or, in some extreme cases, may result in disqualification.
  • If the film receives an overall superior rating at the state level, it may be uploaded to YouTube for national judging.
  • The films will be viewed and critiqued by the judges at the Iowa Thespian Festival

Team Improvisation

Please note, Team Improvisation is NOT an event for the NIES. Therefore, students may NOT qualify for the NIE program at the International Thespian Festival. However, students may be selected to perform as part of the Individual Event Showcase at the Iowa Thespian Festival.
  1. Teams will consist of 2-5 performers.
  2. Each team will draw three situations and select one of the situations to perform. Teams will have two minutes to select which situation to perform.
  3. The performance cannot exceed five (5) minutes. Time will begin with the first word or movement after the performance is introduced.
  4. Props, costumes, or theatrical makeup are not allowed. Participant must wear all black. See NIES Guide for specifics.
  5. Teams will be provided 5 chairs that may be used in the performance.
  6. Team Improvisation will count towards the two Individual Events performances that students may participate in as part of the Individual Event program at the Iowa Thespian Festival
Costume Construction

In Costume Construction, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding of the role of costume construction
  • Sewing and construction skills
  • The ability to present and explain the process of constructing the costume
  • Attention to detail.
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the construction. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. The entrant must prepare and present:
    • A completed EdTA-provided checklist signed by the entrant and his/her troupe director.
    • A fully constructed costume that reflects the entrant’s capabilities and strengths, constructed entirely by the entrant, using one of the approved patterns. A list of historical patterns which lend themselves to an interpretation of a character will be updated annually; see the EdTA website for the listing.
    • A presentation no longer than 8 minutes, followed by 4 minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes.
    • An itemized expense sheet with accompanying receipts for all materials used to construct the costume such as fabric, thread, buttons, zippers, and trim. Total may NOT exceed $100.
    • If millinery, the budget limit is $50, exclusive of the cost of From the Neck Up (book on hatmaking).
    • The expense sheet must be mounted on the display board as proof that the entrant did not exceed their budget.
    • A costume production collage that focuses on the process of building the costume item (laying out the pattern, cutting the fabric, draping the fabric, etc.).
    • Process photos must depict the garment at various stages of construction—not the participant at a sewing machine.
    • The collage must be presented on a 20" x 30" heavy stock display board.
    • The display board must be labeled in the lower right hand corner with the entrant’s name and troupe number and the pattern number.
    • Labels should be considered a part of the presentation; they must be neatly typed or carefully hand lettered.
    • The garment should be presented on a hanger; or if an accessory, in a box. The entrant should NOT wear the costume to the IE session.
Costume Design

In Costume Design, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding of costume design
  • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints which impact design
  • An understanding of the relationship of costume design to a unifying concept
  • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the play
  • The ability to present and explain design choices
  • Attention to detail
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. Designs for either theoretical or realized productions are acceptable.
  3. The entrant must prepare and present:
    • A completed EdTA-provided checklist of all required items signed by the entrant and his/her troupe director (may be included in the artifact binder described below).
    • An 8-minute presentation followed by 4 minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not
    • exceed twelve minutes.
    • Five character renderings, either five different characters, or follow a single character through five changes. More than five character renderings will not be accepted. No finished costumes are permitted.
      • Renderings should be 8″ to 10″ tall.
      • Template or trace characters are permitted.
      • Swatches MUST be included and attached to the lower left hand corner of the display board.
    • The character renderings must each be mounted on either a 10″ x 15″ or 11″ x 17″ heavy stock display board.
    • Board stands are optional. The board should be labelled in the following manner:
      • Upper left hand corner: play title and playwright
      • Upper right hand corner: character’s name, act, and scene
      • Lower right hand corner: entrant’s name and troupe number
      • NO other information may be included on the labels
      • Labels should be considered a part of the presentation; they must be neatly typed or carefully hand lettered.
    • Three identical ½" artifact binders. Each artifact binder must include a complete set of the following materials:
      • A one-page design statement
      • Complete research
      • Theme of play
      • Design unifying concept
      • Script requirements
      • Budgetary requirements or other constraints or considerations
      • Sources of inspiration for design and color palette. (if used)
      • Techniques used within the design
      • Preliminary sketches
      • Costume plot (showing who wears what, when).

Lighting Design

In Lighting Design, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a lighting designer and the technology/equipment to implement and support the design
  • The ability to present and explain design choices.
  • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints which impact lighting design
  • An understanding of the relationship of lighting design to a unifying concept
  • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the play
  • Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. Theoretical or realized designs are acceptable.
  3. The entrant must prepare a presentation no longer than 8 minutes, with an additional 4-minute Q&A summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision making. The overall presentation and Q & A session may not exceed 12 minutes. The presentation should include:
  • Light Plot (1/4" or 1/2" = 1'0" and no larger than 24" x 36") which may be rolled, folded, or mounted, indicating:
    • Color medium
    • Set and masking
    • Areas
    • Lighting positions with labels
    • Type of instrument
    • Unit numbers
    • Circuit
    • Channel
    • Focus/purpose
    • Gobos/patterns/templates
    • Practicals
    • Special instruments (LED, moving lights, foggers, hazers, fans, relays, etc.)
    • Instrument key
    • Title block including:
      • Show title
      • Facility
      • Drawn by
      • Scale
      • Date
  • Three identical ½" artifact binders. Each artifact binder must include a complete set of the following materials:
    • A completed EdTA-provided checklist signed by the entrant and his/her troupe director
    • A one-page design statement summarizing:
      • Research done on recurring themes/motifs, given circumstances of the play, author, and previous productions. (These could include notes, articles, sketches, photographs, colors, etc.)
      • Theme of the play
      • Unifying design concept
      • Script requirements
      • Sources of inspiration
      • Uses of color
      • Techniques used within the design
      • Reflections on the process
    • Instrument schedule
    • Magic sheet/cheat sheet
    • Sample color media used with explanations of choices.
    • Description of 3 light cues organized by act and scene with a stated purpose for the cue and planned timing of the cue. Include a description of the use of intensity, color, movement, directionality, and/or quality of light to communicate to an audience both meaning and emotions during the scene.
      OR
    • Three light renderings that include a description of the use of intensity, color, movement, directionality, and/or quality of light to communicate to an audience both meaning and emotions during the scene.
    • If the production was realized, photos should be included.
 
Scenic Design

In Scenic Design, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding of the scenic designer’s role and responsibilities
  • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints which impact the scenic design
  • An understanding of the relationship of scenic design to a unifying concept
  • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the play
  • The ability to present and explain design choices.
  • Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. Theoretical or realized designs are acceptable.
  3. The entrant must prepare and present:
    • A scale model (in 1/4" or 1/2" to 1'0") OR a perspective rendering (no larger than 11″ x 17″) showing the design and its relationship to the theatrical space. At least one figure must be included in the rendering or model to show proportion and scale. Model or rendering can be generated through multiple media, such as SketchUp, Vectorworks, or 3-D printers.
    • Floor plan (drawn to the same scale) for the production that clearly indicates:
      • Performance space
      • Backstage space
      • Audience areas
      • Sightlines
      • Title block including:
      • Show name
      • Floor plan source
      • Scale
      • Entrant name
      • Date
    • Three identical ½″ artifact binders. Each artifact binder must include a complete set of the following materials:
      • A completed EdTA-provided checklist signed by the entrant and his/her troupe director.
      • A one page design statement summarizing:
      • Theme of the play
      • Unified design concept
      • Script requirements
    • The following may or may not be included in the binder, but must be presented:
      • Complete research
      • Sources of inspiration
      • Floor plan
      • Models or renderings)
      • Techniques within the design
Sound Design

In Sound Design, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a sound designer and the technology/equipment to implement and support the design
  • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints which impact the sound design
  • An understanding of the relationship of sound design to a unifying concept
  • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the play
  • The ability to present and explain design choices.
  • Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. Theoretical or realized designs are acceptable.
  3. The entrant must prepare in a presentation no longer than 8 minutes (with an additional 4 minute Q&A) summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision making. The overall presentation and Q&A should not exceed 12 minutes.
  4. The presentation should include:
  • Sound system plot (two pages maximum), indicating:
    • Speaker plot indicating where on the set and in the performance space loudspeakers will be placed
    • The clear relationship of speakers on the plot to speakers on the block diagram
    • Block diagram indicating signal flow through the sound system following the USITT Sound Graphics Standards (available at www.usitt.org)
    • Board risers
    • Shop orders
    • Rack diagrams
    • Microphone schedules
    • Pit diagrams
    • Patch assignments
    • Sound effects, both digital and Foley
    • Programming of the playback device
    • Engineering the show in a live microphone setting
    • Training the actors in the use of microphones
    • Setting preliminary sound levels and making adjustments during technical rehearsals
    • Title block including:
      • Show name
      • Facility
      • Source for drawing
      • Scale
      • Entrant name
      • Date
  • Three identical ½" artifact binders. Each artifact binder must include a complete set of the following materials:
    • A completed EdTA-provided checklist signed by the entrant and his/her troupe director
    • A one page design statement summarizing:
      • Theme of the play
      • Unified design concept
      • Script requirements
  • The following may or may not be included in the binder, but must be presented:
    • Sources of inspiration
    • Techniques used within the design
    • Representative examples of the sound design to be played on a provided sound system
    • Description of sound cues organized by:
      • Act and scene
      • Stated purpose of the cue
      • Planned timing of the cue
Stage Management

In Stage Management, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding the stage manager’s role and specific responsibilities
  • An understanding of the purpose and value of a production book
  • The ability to organize stage management ideas, products, and choices that support a realized production.
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the presentation. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. The entrant’s presentation must be from a realized production.
  3. The entrant must prepare a presentation no longer than 8 minutes (with an additional 4-minute Q&A) summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision making. The overall presentation and Q&A should not exceed 12 minutes
  4. Entrants should:
    • Approach the process as if he or she is interviewing for a college stage management program or a job
    • Discuss a realized production either in their middle or high school program or a community or professional theatre
    • Articulate the role of the stage manager/stage management process in the focused production
    • Address the collaborative process with cast, crew, director and production team
    • Effectively communicate an understanding of the stage manager’s role as it relates to the focused production
    • Show personality and style
    • Exhibit consistency, clarity, and organization.
  • A production book (three 1/2″ identical binders containing components of the stage management promptbook and paperwork used to perform responsibilities) should include but is not limited to:
    • Prompt script including blocking and all technical cues such as lights, sound, deck, etc. This may be broken into two scripts.
    • Examples of contact sheet, cast list, rehearsal schedule, props list, sound and lighting cue sheets. A written statement of the director’s artistic concept of the production that includes a discussion of the theme and how the theme was executed.
Theatre Marketing

In Theatre Marketing, the skills that will be measured are:

  • An understanding the marketing director’s role and specific responsibilities
  • An understanding of the purpose and value of research, resources, and personnel needed to communicate a marketing concept to an audience
  • The ability to align a marketing campaign’s components in a distribution strategy that supports a realized production.
  1. Only one entrant may be involved in the presentation. No collaborations are permitted.
  2. The entrant’s presentation must be from a realized production.
  3. The entrant must prepare a presentation no longer than 8 minutes (with an additional 4-minute Q&A) summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision making. The overall presentation and Q&A should not exceed 12 minutes.
  4. The presentation should include:
  • A case study that methodically works through the marketing process.
  • The marketing campaign developed and executed for a published play written for the theatre and presented by the school. Designs for performances of poetry, fiction, screenplays, or any other medium are prohibited. It is strongly recommended that the entrant was responsible for actual publicity.
  • Entrants should bring three portfolio binders for adjudicators that contain the components of their marketing campaign, including:
    • A finished poster
    • A finished program
    • Two press releases consisting of an informational article and a feature article
    • A copy of the marketing budget for the publicity campaign and justification of expenses
    • Any work that shows the progression of the creative process, including a brief statement of the design choices inspired by the script, research materials, and other sources of inspiration, if any.
    • Work will be adjudicated on creativity and results, not necessarily how much money was in the budget and how well the money was spent.
  • Presentation Format:
    • Background
    • Introduce self and Thespian troupe number
    • Description of the play
    • Dates of performance/number of shows
    • Description of executing the marketing plan (self and/or team responsibility)
    • Creative development
    • Collaboration with production team
    • Target market (outside of school)
    • Research or inspiration to develop the design concept, if any
    • How the marketing design concept matches the production design
    • The development and creation of the marketing campaign’s design concept
    • Reflections on what might be done differently if more time, money, etc., were available.
  • Execution:
    • Describe and demonstrate the components of the marketing campaign (posters, tickets, promotional handouts, social media, etc.)
    • Explain how and where the marketing was distributed
    • Make clear the consistency in marketing (from the same campaign)
    • Identify elements (images, colors, fonts, etc.) changed to fit the media of marketing components.
  • Realized Outcomes:
    • Indicate budget versus money spent
    • Make note of free services (i.e. copies, printing) or vendor donations
    • Determine what the actual or comparable service would cost
    • Number of tickets sold per performance versus house capacity
    • Compare the outcome to a similar show previously produced.

Securing performance rights for Individual Events materials
It is the responsibility of entrants to obtain permission for the use of copyrighted material. In certain cases, permission is not required. The performance of a song from a published musical in an adjudicated IE program is considered a fair use, and no permission is required. The performance of a monologue or scene from a non-musical play at a State Conference/Festival or in an adjudicated Individual Events program may be subject to one of a number of agreements negotiated between EdTA and several major publishers. Determine the identity of the publisher (noted on the title page of the script, or consult an internet database like findaplay.com or doollee.com), and then check the following listing for that publisher’s policy. If the work is published by a house that’s not included here, an entrant must obtain permission. Complete the appropriate sections of the IE Rights Application and Permission Form and mail it to the publisher or leasing agent. The name and address of the publisher or agent should be in a notice of copyright published with the script.

Broadway Play Publishing, Inc.: http://www.broadwayplaypubl.com All properties are available with no royalty charge.
Dramatic Publishing Co.: http://www.dramaticpublishing.com
There is no charge for use in the Thespian Festival NIEs.
Dramatists Play Service: http://www.dramatists.com
All Dramatists Play Service properties are pre-approved for the Thespian Festival, with no written permission required, for no royalty unless the student is selected for the NIE Showcase. The only exceptions are plays by Samuel Beckett.
Samuel French, Inc.: http://www.samuelfrench.com
A license must be obtained through www.samuelfrench.com for any performance of a copyrighted work, including cuttings and excerpts. Titles which may be approved for cuttings are marked “Cuttings approved for competitions.” A brief summary of proposed cuts or scenes must be included in the appropriate section of your license request. Monologues and brief excerpts of less than ten minutes do not require a license or other permission from Samuel French. When performed for a limited panel of adjudicators, though performances at NIES or other events open to audiences may be subject to a license fee payable to EdTA at the time of the competition. For more information, please visit www.samuelfrench.com.
Playscripts, Inc.: http://www.playscripts.com/rights
Royalties are waived for the performance of excerpts lasting less than ten minutes at adjudicated school theatrical festivals or auditions, unless otherwise noted in the script. These particular performances, and only these, are automatically authorized by the playwright when you purchase books from Playscripts. (Note: Any other cuttings must receive prior approval from Playscripts.)
Smith and Kraus: http://www.smithkraus.com
Most Smith and Kraus collections include a blanket permission statement for audition use. Remember, however, the particular piece you’re interested in performing must be found in one of these collections that include blanket permission.
Theatrefolk: www.theatrefolk.com
Monologues and scenes/excerpts lasting ten minutes or less taken from scripts published by Theatrefolk may be performed in any Thespian Society Individual Event program without royalty.
YouthPLAYS: www.youthplays.com
Royalties are waived for monologues and scenes/excerpts lasting less than 10 minutes for Thespian IEs. To receive a statement of permission, an entrant must purchase a single, printable perusal copy of the play through the YouthPLAYS website and then email info@youthplays.com with their name(s), school, and event information.